Dutch photography magazines

The things you want to get better at you need to consume and you need to practice.

Consumption of photography can be done, amongst a great number of other ways, through the consumption of photography magazines.

Problem #1: when people say “photography magazines”, they mean “camera equipment magazines”. You know the type, left page is an ad, right page is something that is supposed to be not an ad, although for some reason they both try to sell you gear you don’t need.

Sometimes photography magazines are called art magazines, sometimes niche.

Problem #2: magazines are dying out. I’ll count vlogs and blogs too if I run across them.

Problem #3: I am an old man and used to things being a certain way.

That is not the problem.

The problem is that our modern-day neo-liberal hipster paradise, everything, including magazines, are a thing. In my day you went to the copy-shop, copied what you had, and if you had readers, you had a magazine (or fanzine). Nowadays when the thing is no longer cool, you no longer have a magazine. I hope this makes at all sense.

What I am saying is that it is difficult to see if what you have is a magazine or if the makers are about to get bored.

I don’t, at this point, want to drop the phrase “continual effort”, because that sounds like an obligation and a drag, but… Anyway.

Let us also hope I won’t forget to keep this list up to date.

FOAM Magazine, of the museum in Amsterdam, 3x a year, since 2002.

GUP (Guide to Unique Photography), 4x a year, since 2005.

FW, FW:Books, 2004 – 2010.

Extra, FW:Books (essays), 2x a year.

Newdawn, by the makers of GUP, 6x a year, 2014 – 2015, no longer in print.

Newdawn, the blog continuation of Newdawn.

Ordinary, 4x a year.

March & Rock, photos by Maarten Rots, 3x a year, since 2015.

(I don’t count Unseen Magazine, because a frequency of once a year makes it a almanac, not a magazine. Same goes for Cindy Baar’s The Butter Space.)

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