Copyright alternative

Copyright is of course one of the several ways that government can try and stimulate the creation of works–and a rather imperfect one at that.

But the alternatives are not all roses either. Subsidizing artists may be dandy, but how are you going to make sure subsidies are fairly distributed? The Dutch government has always taken the cowardly way out: basically anybody willing to admit to being an artist got a grant, or got their “art” bought by the government.

The Viennese municipal government has come up with a plan that kills two birds with one stone. It lets artists decide via reputation-based software which of them is most deserving of the grant money. I say “two birds”, because most of the painters and sculptors it is my distinct unpleasure to be vaguely acquainted with feel that only they can tell what art is. Well, exactly! Thank you Vienna!

(Via BoingBoing.)

5 responses to “Copyright alternative”

  1. Reinder says:

    But the alternatives are not all roses either. Subsidizing artists may be dandy, but how are you going to make sure subsidies are fairly distributed? The Dutch government has always taken the cowardly way out: basically anybody willing to admit to being an artist got a grant, or got their “art” bought by the government.

    Must have been a comfortable rock if you’ve spent all your time since 1985 under it.

  2. Branko Collin says:

    Is that when they killed the WIK?

  3. Reinder says:

    No, but the WIK doesn’t work that way at all – it requires tangible proof of the grantee being an artist, in the form of either a fresh art school diploma or accounts showing you made a certain amount of money from art. The most recent revision requires a larger quota of earned money each year although it drops the requirement that all of it comes from art.
    It was about that time they started killing the BKR, which did work that way and was a terrible policy for that reason.

  4. Branko Collin says:

    Wasn’t there a system in place in between the BKR and the WIK where municipalities had to buy art works, which were then stowed away in storage? Or was that the BKR?

  5. Reinder says:

    That was the BKR.

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